Clematis 'Stand by Me Lavender'

Status: Out of Stock
Mature Height: 3 ft.
Mature Spread: 2 to 3 ft.
Proper Name: Clematis 'Stand by Me Lavender' PPAF CPBRAF

Product type: Perennial - Pot

Tags: Bloom Summer, Deer Resistant, Feeds Pollinators, Flower (Purple), Full Sun, Part Sun

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Description

Unlike their climbing cousins the bush clematis keeps a lower profile, but what they do share are the prolific and unique blooms. Dark purple buds open into lavender purples, bell-shaped flowers that appear to ring in a gentle breeze. After flowering, attractive star shaped threadlike seed heads emerge creating a showy display among the still profuse flowers. 

For those looking for a low-maintenance plant it is best to look elsewhere, but those who work their gardens regularly will be rewarded. Plants benefit from staking and light cages are even better for keeping the broad deep-green foliage upright during the growing season. Clematis should be pruned each year to the previous year's wood, but this can be tricky as their dense structure makes it more challenging. Pruning should be done in winter or early spring, and will eliminate spring flowers - meaning you’ll have to wait for summer to experience the gorgeous blooms. For those who want spring flowers, restorative pruning can be done by pruning back ⅓ of the branches and leaving ⅔ to grow.

Photos courtesy of Walter Gardens

Bloom Color:Purple shades
Bloom Period:Late spring to summer
Genus & Species:Clematis 'Stand by Me Lavender' PPAF CPBRAF
Mature Height:3 ft.
Mature Spread:2 to 3 ft.
Plant Spacing:3 ft.
Planting Depth:Plant crown slightly below soil
Planting Time:Late winter to spring
Soil Type:Prefers soil with good drainage and moisture
Sun Exposure:Full sun to part sun
Zone:3 to 7

General care for any tree or shrub is easy, but like any living thing will require your attention. Please educate yourself and follow these simple rules.

Caring for Clematis 'Stand by Me Lavender'

Plants benefit from staking and light cages are even better for keeping the broad deep-green foliage upright during the growing season. Clematis should be pruned each year to the previous year's wood, but this can be tricky as their dense structure makes it more challenging. Pruning should be done in winter or early spring, and will eliminate spring flowers - meaning you’ll have to wait for summer to experience the gorgeous blooms. For those who want spring flowers, restorative pruning can be done by pruning back ⅓ of the branches and leaving ⅔ to grow.

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